July Slut of the Month: Teresa Nasty

1 Comment 🕔28 Jun 2013

As an artist and professional New York City dom, our July Slut of the Month, Teresa Nasty, can rifle through the elusive psychic underpinnings of sex, power, and gender with sharp-tongued erudition and seductive grace. Her full interview continues after the Slut questionnaire.

I am: a supernatural embodiment of many powerful female archetypes packed into a compact vessel.

By Day: a shape-shifter

By Night: a quiet paradox

My Vices: thinking

My Virtues: feeling

The Present: is a gift

The Future: is just a concept

Favorite Flavor: the salt of a lover’s skin

Favorite Feeling: unfettered flight

Favorite Fabric: loose silk draping beneath tightly bound leather

Substance is: the gold that backs the paper

Style is: an expression of substance

Slut is: courage to own and express and celebrate yourself as a sexual being

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What turns you on?

The ability to harmonize intellect with heart. Pheromonal chemistry. A handsome vocabulary. Equilibrium between masculine and feminine qualities. A walk in the woods with the prospect of getting horizontal on some lush pillows of moss. Travel to exotic lands. Lightheartedness. A nice set of hands.

What turns you off?

Rigidity and stubbornness. Relentless machismo or arrogance. Excessive emotional baggage. Mental laziness. Bad attitude. The inability to take responsibility for your own actions and subsequently life. Chronic halitosis. Ugly shoes.

How do you think bodies, sexuality, and sexual energy are treated in New York versus the other US cities you’ve lived in? What about when compared with Taipei?

New York is certainly the most progressive city I’ve in habited in America, but still a far way from being truly European in its candor of sexual body. As for the Bible Belt US cities, I can’t even begin to think about how puritanical an attitude many of them have sustained thanks to the cloak of organized religion and the concern of being “morally upright”. Where New York has decriminalized public nudity, Texas, for example, is still trying to button more buttons up, but there are no more buttons. I feel a sadness for all of the people who may never get to discover the freedom and liberation of being a sexual being, of loving our bodies and finding beauty in the union of souls inside bodies engaged in an act of love, however fleeting, of living a life that perpetuates openness and loving instead of condemning, hiding, and fearing. I feel that the US as a whole is ready for a new way to approach our sexualities and is even bursting with misdirected sexual energies. New York takes a slightly more light-hearted and exploratory approach to sexuality, allowing for such venues to hold “play parties” and glorifying this city’s acceptance of a freer expression of sexual energy.

I wish I could discourse on this subject about Taipei, but I only lived there briefly as a child so my perceptions on such matters were non-existent.

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In your work as your dom, navigating power dynamics is key; how do you view female sexuality as it relates to dominance and submission?

Female sexuality is the most powerful tool in navigating power dynamics, because all of my clients, being male, have experienced some form of it in their lives. Be it a mother, an ex or current girlfriend or wife, they know that ultimately, in their heterosexual minds, we hold the key to their salvation of expression and fulfillment.

The concept of female sexuality is complex and enigmatic to most men because theirs is much more direct and simple. Most female libidos are constantly in flux and contingent on three hundred and eighty-five factors as opposed to just a few for men, so the dichotomy of male to female sexuality is usually misaligned and mystifying. For a man to completely understand it would take years with that one individual, but he would still not have an comprehensive understanding of all women’s’ sexuality. In my profession, it is not about understanding the dominant’s sexuality but deriving pleasure from obeying and submitting to her to please her. Because ultimately, a man will never completely know a woman’s sexuality, and that admission of ignorance requires surrender to her.

Do you consider yourself a feminist?

I do not consider myself a feminist, even though I am only vaguely familiar with the concept. It never interested me to be equal to a man, mainly because I think females are clearly superior to men. In our superiority, we would never try to disempower men, but gently utilize their strengths so that we could all work together harmoniously. I believe in the dynamics of fluidity and harmony. As feminism seems like a staunch way of being personally, I am certainly not opposed to it and am very glad that there are feminists out there fighting the good fight.

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Your wit and intellect is arguably just as important as your body and sexual energy in your profession, although there seems to be a disconnect in contemporary society between the two. How can your art form inform the way we understand the binaries of sex and smarts, beauty and brains?

I think it comes down to embracing and embodying both aspects of gender; masculine and feminine, the anima and the animus. Not only having an awareness of preconceived gender roles but also setting an example of the possibility of fluidly being both. Of course I don’t mean it literally (although I do find myself wearing a strap-on quite often), I mean energetically. As a dominatrix, I take on the “male” role of being the one in control of the scenario, I call the shots and decide what activities we engage in and what warrants a reward or punishment. I think much of my perspective comes from having been raised by a single mother, who had to be both parents at different times. But with that kind of power, the gentleness and cunning of my femininity is what makes the experience beguiling to obey.

In this modern time, you don’t have to only choose one or the other anymore. Rigid social conditions are wearing off and we are seeing many people who can have their cake and eat it too. The trend of “sexy nerd” is just one example of younger people embracing beauty and brains.

How did you get into photography?

In high school, I took a photography class and borrowed my step-father’s old tank of a Canon. My interests have always leaned toward the arts, so photography seemed as natural as walking. I also had a fondness for the technical aspects of creativity, the process and the gratification of immediacy, and photography fulfilled all of those. When I got into college, I thought I would be pragmatic and study communication design, but that was no fun at all! After switching majors to fine art/photography with my mother’s blessing, I was able to really explore the more conceptual side of developing a theme and going deeper into what makes photography art. I’ve worked all over Dallas assisting other professional photographers and always had fun making photos, manipulating light, and creating a finished product that wowed others. But in the end, I couldn’t see myself being solely a professional photographer.

Photography is my way of expressing the individual beauty I see in people. Sometimes I meet a person, usually female, who inspires me to want to take photos. These people I speak of are not what is traditionally defined as beautiful, and I like that. I like the notion of transformation, artifice, smoke and mirrors.

I also make a lot of self-portraits because at times I forget what shape I’ve shifted into, and looking in the mirror is not enough (even though I do plenty of that, too. My apartment is filled with mirrors that were original to the previous owners and my place of work has one giant wall of mirror in each room). It’s important to me to play with each new shape to see how many different disguises I can come up with.

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What are your aesthetic inspirations?

Rembrandt and Caravaggio’s chiaroscuro; navigating the gold between shadow and light. Richness in color and texture. At times, David Lachapelle and Pierre et Gilles move me. I like boldness and glamour, provocation and darkness.

The photographs on your site are very intimate, sensual and sometimes voyeuristic, do you view it as another outlet for sexual energy?

Absolutely. Where does art meet sex, but also, how can it be both without being blatant or obscene? Also, that provocative moment during seduction where there’s no turning back as a pivotal narrative image are all ideas I think about when taking a photograph.

Voyeurism has always been of utmost fascination to me from when I can recall consciousness. I have a general fascination with the secrets people keep tucked away behind closed curtains and in the back of their drawers.

*All photos by Teresa Nasty except first (Scogin Mayo) and final (Jong)

About Author

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KristenKorvette

syllabic stylist with a heart on for sex positive feminism. slutist founder & editrix.

1 Comments

  1. 🕔 15:13, 02.Jul 2013

    Amber

    The most creative person per pound in NYC. And so cute!

    reply comment

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